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Alley Cat's tips to great photography

Alison Watkins
To capture the colors of the sunset I had to set the camera for the light, making everything else silhouetted. Photo by Alison Watkins.
Follow this column for photography techniques and advice from Alison Watkins.


Chapter 4: Sunrises and Sunsets

Our biggest, oldest, and brightest light source is our lovely sun. Because it’s been around since the beginning of time, humans have been marveled by, lived by, and even worshiped the sunrises and sunsets.

To capture our magnificent sun at the best time there are some general rules.

The photographer has to pay attention to the landscape. The same goes for all photos, not just sunrises/sunsets. Not only do you have to pay attention the background, you should check all four corners before taking the photo. For the most part sunrise and sunset photos have a lot of sky, to show all the color and light possible.

Mini science lesson: The sky turns to beautiful reds, oranges, yellows, and even purples during the sun's rise and set. This is due a phenomenon called “scatter,” which happens when the sun's light is refracting though many different particles that change the wave length of the light to then change the colors to the beautiful reds, oranges, and yellows we see.

Even though the subject is the sun, it’s a bit boring to take photo of just the sun. Try adding some pizzazz by including some people, places, or landscapes to the photo.

Adding too much could be a double-edged sword. For an unexplainable reason when the sunsets or sunrises are taken in photo form, our brains are not fond of clutter. Power lines, poles, chain link fences, and other man-made junk are found displeasing. Make sure to leave those out of the photo or crop them out in the editing process.

Next week I'll be discussing black and white photography. In the coming weeks these column will grow more advanced with more terminology related to camera settings and composition and design. Check back at the same Alley Cat time, same Alley Cat channel!

alison.watkins@fhspress.com

Alley Cat's
Photo Tips

CHAPTERS

Start shooting
Cameras
Composition
Sunrises and Sunsets
Black and White
Portraits
Landscapes
Long Exposure
Light PART ONE
Light PART TWO
Shoot in RAW
s
Back Button Focusing
The Challenges of      
      Sports Photography
Studio Photography
Lenses
FX and DX
Street Photography
Painting with Light
Filters
Bokeh vs. Blurry
Tripods and Mounts
File Naming and
      Organizing

-Printing and Resolution


-Flashes
-Paid Gigs
-Gadgets and Gizmos
-HDR
-Film Photography

FOOTHILL HIGH SCHOOL    fhspress.com    SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA



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