Home button
News button
Opinion button
Student Life Button
Sports button
Feature button
All Headlines button
Clubs Digest page
Sports Roundup button
Letters button
In Print button
Advertising button
fhspress.com Staff button
fhswebsite.info button
Orientation button
Archives button
Contact FHS
Yearbook button
FHS Web Store button
Mustang Stampede logo
Foothill High School logo
Banner
Alley Cat's tips to great photography

Alison Watkins
Above: Junior Mazi Hurtado is the model. Portraits can be black and white to have an epic effect, cropped to the waist. Below: Senior Debbie Xiong poses for her portrait, cropped above the elbow. Photos by Alison Watkins
debbie
Follow this column for photography techniques and advice from Alison Watkins.


Chapter 6: Portraits

Once upon a time, hiring a painter to paint a portrait was the norm. Eventually it progressed to hiring photographers taking photo portraits. Nowadays, selfies taken by oneself is all some people think about.

It may seem easy to take someone’s portrait, but in actuality, it is a skill ready to be mastered. Like anything, taking portraits takes practice.

Some things that are good to remember include: low f-stop, focus on the eyes, and do not cut off anything important. A low f-stop is necessary to blur the background and to emphasize the focus on the eyes.

People say eyes are the windows to the soul, so in photographs or paintings, the eyes need to be in great focus. Even in photos that are not portraits, if the subject has eyes, make sure they are in focus. So, for any object with eyes, such as stuffed animals or bugs, the eyes should be in focus. For example, a cookie doesn't have eyes so there are no eyes to be in focus.

It’s very important to not cut off your subject's body parts. Specific places are the top of their head, just their hands, or just their feet. Keep a good, equal amount of space from the subject from all sides.

Portraits can be simple or creative. One simple way is a close-up on their face and cropped at the shoulders. Most creative portraits are found as informal senior portraits, they are fun and lively to show how fun they are before working and college.

It is not neccessary to have a studio to take portraits. You can shoot pretty much any place where there is good light and where you can control the background from having distractions.

Next week I'll be discussing landscape photography. Check back at the same Alley Cat time, same Alley Cat channel!

alison.watkins@fhspress.com

Alley Cat's
Photo Tips

CHAPTERS

Start shooting
Cameras
Composition
Sunrises and Sunsets
Black and White
Portraits
Landscapes
Long Exposure
Light PART ONE
Light PART TWO
Shoot in RAW
s
Back Button Focusing
The Challenges of      
      Sports Photography
Studio Photography
Lenses
FX and DX
Street Photography
Painting with Light
Filters
Bokeh vs. Blurry
Tripods and Mounts
File Naming and
      Organizing

-Printing and Resolution


-Flashes
-Paid Gigs
-Gadgets and Gizmos
-HDR
-Film Photography

FOOTHILL HIGH SCHOOL    fhspress.com    SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA



| HOME | NEWS | OPINION | STUDENT LIFE | SPORTS | FEATURE|
| All Headlines | Clubs Digest | Sports Roundup | Letters | Orientation |
| In Print |Archives | Advertising | fhspress Staff | Contact fhspress | Yearbook | FHS Web Store |
| Foothill High School Web Site | Twin Rivers Unified School District |