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Alley Cat's tips to great photography

FX DX
Cameras and lenses will have a little marker like this to let you know the format. Once you have your camera long enough you'll know the format.
Follow this column for photography techniques and advice from Alison Watkins.


Chapter 17: FX and DX

Lenses have their specific uses and qualities. There is a very big difference between two versions of possible lens choices. There are two categories: FX and DX. You can find out whether it’s FX or DX on the front of your camera and the side of your lens.

This is important to note because if they don’t match then there are some consequences.

FX cameras have a bigger sensor. FX is also referred to as “35mm” because of photography film width in the past. This helps to differentiate small sensors and large sensors. These sensors are mostly used professionally, and of course these cameras and lenses cost more than DX.

DX cameras have a smaller sensor. These sensors are cheaper and are in most beginner and intermediate cameras.

Lenses are a different story. You may think, “I can probably put this macro DX on my FX camera,” but you may not want to. Some funky things happen when you change formats.

If you put a DX lens on an FX camera, the image is cropped because the lens is not large enough to fill the entire sensor.

If you put an FX lens on a DX camera then the focal length is increased one-half times over. This happens because the lens can fill a frame much bigger and therefore is perceived as extending the focal length, basically the camera is zoomed in constantly. You can use this to your advantage, say, if you had an FX 200mm lens and needed a 300mm but don’t have one. By slapping that FX 200mm lens on a DX camera you easily have a 300mm lens, magic.

FX cameras don't necessarily take bigger images. Two cameras come to mind, the Nikon D4s and the Nikon D3300. There are some major diffrences between them, one is an extremely professional camera and the other is a consumer camera. The D3300 has a file size of 24 megapixels while the D4s has only 16 megapixels. When choosing the D4s over the D3300 it comes down to ISO capabilities, speed, and of course, cost.

Next week I'll discuss the "Do's and Don'ts" of street photography. Check back at the same Alley Cat time, same Alley Cat channel!

alison.watkins@fhspress.com

Alley Cat's
Photo Tips

CHAPTERS

Start shooting
Cameras
Composition
Sunrises and Sunsets
Black and White
Portraits
Landscapes
Long Exposure
Light PART ONE
Light PART TWO
Shoot in RAW
s
Back Button Focusing
The Challenges of      
      Sports Photography
Studio Photography
Lenses
FX and DX
Street Photography
Painting with Light
Filters
Bokeh vs. Blurry
Tripods and Mounts
File Naming and
      Organizing

-Printing and Resolution


-Flashes
-Paid Gigs
-Gadgets and Gizmos
-HDR
-Film Photography

FOOTHILL HIGH SCHOOL    fhspress.com    SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA



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