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Alley Cat's tips to great photography

photography
I simply used my phone flash light while pointing it at the camera with a 30 second exposure. I decided to "paint" the word "Photography," because why not?
thomas
While in a pitch black room with my model, Thomas Catipon, I told him to stand still while I "painted" his face with light. If he moves the slightest bit then the image would come out blurry because of the shutter being open for a full 30 seconds. This is one exposure, so I turned off the light each time he repositioned himself.
Follow this column for photography techniques and advice from Alison Watkins.


Chapter 20: Light Painting

I’ve mentioned that the word “photograph” means “painting with light.” This is taking light painting to the next, literal, level.

Painting with light is an easy process. This is very effective when done in dark areas or at night. You can buy a special light stick for painting with light but for some things a simple flashlight or phone flash light will do the trick.

You’ll definitely need a tripod to set your camera for 30 seconds for any light painting shots. You may want a shutter release button to keep it open for however long is necessary, A.K.A. BULB mode on your camera. The sensor picks up light, when there is no light then the sensor will grasp at whatever light is available; in this case it's the flashlight.

There are two ways to use light painting. One way is to point the light at the the sensor so that it can pick up the light. A phone flashlight is perfectly fine for this method.

The other way is to open the shutter, go to your subject, and point the flash light at the subject and spread the light all over it. Be careful to not flash the light towards the camera, otherwise the sensor will pick up the light versus the subject. I do not suggest a phone for this method because our phone flashlights are not actually that bright nor filling.

Try to imagine a paint brush that you need to cover a whole canvas with paint but in this case the canvas is the subject and the paint is that light. The brush is the flashlight or phone you are using.

Next week I will be discussing the difference between bokeh and blurry. Check back at the same Alley Cat time, same Alley Cat channel!

alison.watkins@fhspress.com

Alley Cat's
Photo Tips

CHAPTERS

Start shooting
Cameras
Composition
Sunrises and Sunsets
Black and White
Portraits
Landscapes
Long Exposure
Light PART ONE
Light PART TWO
Shoot in RAW
s
Back Button Focusing
The Challenges of      
      Sports Photography
Studio Photography
Lenses
FX and DX
Street Photography
Painting with Light
Filters
Bokeh vs. Blurry
Tripods and Mounts
File Naming and
      Organizing

-Printing and Resolution


-Flashes
-Paid Gigs
-Gadgets and Gizmos
-HDR
-Film Photography

FOOTHILL HIGH SCHOOL    fhspress.com    SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA



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