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Alley Cat's tips to great photography

filters


A seemingly broken lens is actually not broken at all with the help from a helpful UV filter.

silky
On a bright summer day at the river I slapped an ND filter onto my camera to slow my shutter speed to 1/40 to achieve this style.
Follow this column for photography techniques and advice from Alison Watkins.


Chapter 20: Filters

Film cameras had a lot more steps to taking a photo instead of just the press of a button. With film, everything counted, from beginning to end, the photographer had to think exactly how the end product would look. When taking pictures, it all comes down to what is seen through the lens, the settings of the camera sensor, the subject, and the development of the image. This week's topic is how the photographer can affect the image though the lens with filters.

Filters are glass panes that can either attach to the lens itself or simply be in front of the lens with a tripod contraption-like-thing. Of course prices vary and you must choose for your budget. Something to save your wallet would be a UV filter. It’s simply a clear filter to semi-improve the photos, but mostly to protect the actual lens glass. It is better to break a $15 filter instead of buying a whole new lens for $500 or more if broken.

A polarizing filter helps with sky tint. While taking a photo of a landscape, if you set the camera for the whole image, top to bottom, then the sky will more than likely be overexposed and the land/subject will be underexposed. A polarizer is split in the middle; one side is darker one stop, and the other is clear. The clear side is meant for the land/subject and the darker side is meant for the sky. Using this kind of filter will bring out nice details in the sky and clouds.

A neutral density filter helps when the desired settings are too still too bright for the conditions of the photo. ND filters come in different levels such as; 0.2, 0.6, 0.8, 2.0 and so forth. These filters are great for motion photography in the day time as well. Capturing water flowing in a classic silky fashion can also be achieved by using an ND filter.

Next week I will be discussing the difference between bokeh and blurry. Check back at the same Alley Cat time, same Alley Cat channel!

alison.watkins@fhspress.com

Alley Cat's
Photo Tips

CHAPTERS

Start shooting
Cameras
Composition
Sunrises and Sunsets
Black and White
Portraits
Landscapes
Long Exposure
Light PART ONE
Light PART TWO
Shoot in RAW
s
Back Button Focusing
The Challenges of      
      Sports Photography
Studio Photography
Lenses
FX and DX
Street Photography
Painting with Light
Filters
Bokeh vs. Blurry
Tripods and Mounts
File Naming and
      Organizing

-Printing and Resolution


-Flashes
-Paid Gigs
-Gadgets and Gizmos
-HDR
-Film Photography

FOOTHILL HIGH SCHOOL    fhspress.com    SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA



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